Past Events

16
Jun
2016
Future of Work Programme: Collaborative work in the construction industry? The case of schools

Barclay Room, Green Templeton College

Future of Work Programme: Collaborative work in the construction industry? The case of schools

About the seminar
This seminar will explore the design and construction of building as a prime example of multi-agency working. There will also be a discussion about the extent to which constructors, architects, engineers and commissioners are prepared to undertake this kind of work and the consequences of their actions when they are not.

Speakers
Harry Daniels is Professor of Education in the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a GTC Fellow. He specialises in the development of post-Vygotskian and activity theories and studies learning across a wide range of domains from these perspectives. His current research focuses on the relationship between design and practice.

Hau Ming Tse is a Research Fellow in the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a member of the Technical Advisory Group for the OECD Centre for Effective Learning Environments. Hau Ming was an Associate Director at David Chipperfield Architects until 2007. Her current research examines the complex relationship between design and educational practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Registration
Spaces are limited and registration is essential by Monday 13 June.

Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register.








10
Mar
2016
The Oxford University Digital Transformation of Work Conference

E.P Abraham Lecture Theatre

As part of the Green Templeton College Future of Work Programme we are bringing together leading researchers to consider the ways in which digitalisation and the internet are globally transforming work, employment and labour markets.

This one-day conference features:

The conference will be held at the E.P Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green Templeton College, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6HG. Registration will open at 9:00 and the conference will run from 10:00-16:30.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided throughout the day. Attendance is free and open to all but places are limited so please book in advance by emailing: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.








11
Jun
2015
Volatility, Organizational Design and the Global Division of Innovative Labor

Barclay Room, Green Templeton College

Hiram Samel - Said Business School (SBS)

Lunch will be provided.

Part of the Trinity Term 2015 Seminar Series

Hiram Samel is an Associate Professor of International Business at the Said Business School and a Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford. His research examines how entrepreneurial firms leverage national systems of innovation and production to build capabilities necessary to meet the shifting demands of global technology markets. He is particularly interested in how these strategies impact national policy goals of social and economic development. His current focus is on the clean energy, semiconductor, electronics, biopharma and advanced materials industries. Prior to receiving his PhD, he was an entrepreneur, building and managing mid-sized companies that operated in twenty countries. He is also an investor in and director at a variety of early-stage energy and medical device companies. He received an AB from Brown University, magna cum laude, and a PhD and SM in Management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he was a Ford-MIT Energy Fellow and a Beyster Fellow.

Abstract: Upgrading has been a main policy focus of the development literature for the past two decades. The predominant model has firms with low capabilities moving up the value chain through learning in global production networks and support of robust local institutions. When upgrading efforts fail, the recommended solution is to pour in more resources. Yet little has changed. Using a critical case study of the Penang semiconductor cluster, this paper proposes an alternative set of hypotheses about upgrading in emerging economies. In this seminar we will argue that demand volatility increasingly determines the international division of labor in emerging economies, not the search for low wages.








04
Jun
2015
Digital Labour and Development: New Knowledge Economies or Digital Sweatshops?

Barclay Room, Green Templeton College

Mark Graham - Oxford Internet Institute (OII)

Lunch will be provided.

Part of the Trinity Term 2015 Seminar Series

Mark Graham is an Associate Professor and Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, a Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, and an Associate in the University of Oxford's School of Geography and the Environment. He has published articles in major geography, communications, and urban studies journals, and his work has been covered by the Economist, the BBC, the Washington Post, CNN, the Guardian, and many other media. He is an editorial board member of Information, Communication, and Society, Geo:Geography, Environment and Planning A, and Big Data & Society. He is also a member of DFID's Digital Advisory Panel and the ESRC's Peer Review College. In 2014, he was awarded a European Research Council Starting Grant to lead a team to study 'knowledge economies' in Sub-Saharan Africa over five years.

Abstract: In most of the world's low-income countries, unemployment is a major social and economic concern for policy makers. South Africa, for instance, has a youth unemployment rate of almost 50%. At the same time, we are currently at a moment in which 3 billion people now are connected to the Internet: a majority of whom live in low-income countries. In response to this convergence of poverty and connectivity, many international development organisations have been attracted to digital labour as a way of bringing jobs to the world's poor. This seminar draws on initial findings from an ongoing, mixed-method research project investigating value networks, discourses, and practices of digital labour in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. It allows us to begin to address whether any global inequalities can be effectively addressed through digital labour or whether such practices only reproduce and expand exploitative relationships.








28
May
2015
Changing Career Structures and Innovation in Professional Firms

Barclay Room, Green Templeton College

Tim Morris - Said Business School (SBS)

Part of the Trinity Term 2015 Seminar Series

Lunch will be provided.

Tim Morris is Professor of Management Studies at Saïd Business School. Tim’s research and teaching activities focus on leadership and on the growing and increasingly important field of professional service firms (PSFs) in which he is acknowledged as a leading international expert. Tim has published extensively in leading international journals including Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management Studies and Organization Studies. He has authored numerous chapters in collected editions, particularly on innovation and change in professional service firms. His recent work concerns the effects of power on change, relationships between career systems and innovation capacity, patterns of organisational design and processes of developing competitive advantage in professional service firms. Before taking up his chair at Oxford in 2002, Tim was a Professor at Imperial College, London, and at London Business School. He has a BA in Social and Political Science from Cambridge University and an MSc and PhD from the London School of Economics.

Abstract: In this seminar we will discuss how changes to the career model in professional service firms, such as law, accounting and consulting, creates the potential for change in the origins and degree of innovation in these firms. The context is that these firms have traditionally used an up-or-out promotion system which underpins a broader organisational model, and this model defines how work gets done and where innovation occurs. Recent changes to the promotion system impact on career options and on the organisational model. In turn, these trigger the potential for innovation to occur in new and different ways which were not anticipated by the architects of change. The relationship between organisational change and innovation has implications for a wider set of organisations which are principally dependent on their core professionals for innovatory activities.








21
May
2015
The Future of Leadership: Embracing the Paradoxes of Leadership and Harnessing the Power of Doubt

Barclay Room, Green Templeton College

Michael Smets - Said Business School (SBS)

Part of the Trinity Term 2015 Seminar Series

Lunch will be provided.

Michael Smets is Associate Professor in Management and Organisation Studies at Saïd Business School. He is also a Research Fellow at Green Templeton College where he received both his MSc and DPhil degrees. Michael's research focuses on leadership, the management of competing stakeholder demands in complex organisational environments, and the internationalisation and innovation of professional services. Michael's research has appeared in leading management journals, academic handbooks and practitioner publications and has been covered by the Financial Times, Forbes, and a number of industry publications. He has won the 2012 Best Paper Award of the Academy of Management Journal, one of the most highly ranked journals in the field, and his study of Lloyd's of London has received the ESRC's inaugural award for "Outstanding Impact in Business" in 2013. This presentation draws on his latest study which was initially presented at the World Economic forum in Davos in January 2015.

Abstract: In an increasingly connected and complex world, we confront increasingly paradoxical choices at work. What was once a clear choice between "right" and "wrong" has morphed into a balancing act between "right" and "right". Pressures to honour multiple - often conflicting - demands and commitments has become the rule, rather than exception - whether you are in business, medicine, or social enterprise. Based on an in-depth study of 150 CEOs from around the world, this seminar explores ways to embrace the paradoxes of leadership as a source of strength, rather than paralysis and to harness the power of doubt for more decisive action.








07
May
2015
The Future of Work: Jobs and Skills in 2030

Barclay Room, Green Templeton College

Peter Glover - UK Commission for Employment & Skills (UKCES)

Part of the Trinity Term 2015 Seminar Series

Lunch will be provided.

Peter Glover is a Senior Research Manager at the UK Commission for Employment and Skills. He has 20 years of experience in the field of labour market analysis, with a focus on local labour markets, sectoral skills needs and national skills priorities. Recent projects he has worked on include Working Futures 2012-2022 and Careers of the Future, both published by the UK Commission. He is project director for the Future of Work study, published in spring 2014.

Abstract: The last 20 years have seen huge changes in the UK labour market arising out of a range of drivers including globalisation and technology, which few if any could have predicted. The accelerating rate of change that we can all observe in today's world could mean an even greater transformation in the years to come. This seminar will draw on the UKCES Future of Work study, focusing on the following elements:

  • Key trends expected to shape the future development of the UK labour market
  • Potential disruptions that can lead to a sharp deviation from established trends
  • Alternative scenarios that have been produced, one of which is reference case, three which model the impact of disruptions







27
Nov
2014
The Work of Frugal Innovation

Yasser Bhatti
DPhil Graduate, Said Business School, University of Oxford







24
Nov
2014
Meaningful Work: Emerging Findings and Research Agenda

Katie Bailey
Professor of Management,
University of Sussex

Adrian Madden
Research Fellow, University of Sussex







20
Nov
2014
God at Work: Entrepreneurship from an Islamic Perspective

Ali Gumusay
DPhil Candidate, Said Business School, University of Oxford







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